Entertainment Now with T.M. Powell

Movie Review: The Grand Budapest Hotel

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Credit: Fox Searchlight Pictures

Credit: Fox Searchlight Pictures

CW44_TMPowell_4x3 T.M. Powell
I'm CW44's Media Critic & '44 on the Town' Co-Host. I make...
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Wes Anderson is not for everyone. I rather enjoy the genius of quirk, but I could see how chatty and weird dialogue spouted from rather cartoonish characters could turn viewers off. I can relate since much of The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou left me rolling my eyes and checking my watch. For the most part, I enjoy Wes Anderson, but if you don’t, my suggestion would be to not see The Grand Budapest Hotel and go ahead and stop reading this review (I already have the web hit). If you’re still here then lets dive into Wes Anderson’s best film in years.

The Grand Budapest Hotel tells the wild tale of the concierge of the aforementioned hotel and his loyal lobby boy, Zero (Tony Revolori in his breakout role). Ralph Fiennes takes on a surprisingly comical role as the old lady romancing Concierge Gustave. For a guy who played one of the most evil men on film in Schindler’s List, Fiennes showed off a funny bone I didn’t know he had. Gustave spits out curse words in the most eloquent fashion and in return you can’t help but giggle. Fiennes’s dramatic skills come in handy when needed in The Grand Budapest Hotel, but for the most part, the English man known for playing classic movie villains keeps us in stitches.

Most of The Grand Budapest Hotel takes place on a European mountainside on the brink of war with soldiers who look very similar to NAZIs. Once again, Wes Anderson gives you a film that looks like it leaped from the pages of an old picture book you found in an estate sale. The cinematography is Anderson’s best whether it’s a shot of the beautiful lobby of The Grand Budapest Hotel or the snowy mountain town just down the road.

Anderson’s editing style is still ever-present in The Grand Budapest Hotel as he uses quick cuts, stills and crude animation to tell his story of Gustave and Zero’s escapades. This is Anderson’s most aesthetically pleasing film venture to date. If you’re a fan of his cute and quirky past work, then The Grand Budapest Hotel is a must see.

Overall, I give The Grand Budapest Hotel 3.5 out of 4 stars.

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