French President: "We need an open and transparent International Investigation to avoid, first of all, things being hidden, but also to stop doubt setting in.'

Beirut, Lebanon (CW44 News At 10) – People in Beirut, Lebanon are protesting against the government after a giant explosion killed more than 150 people on August 4, 2020. Demonstrators claimed corruption led to Tuesday’s blast which destroyed thousands of homes and a large amount of the country’s food supply.

Grief has turned to anger in Beirut. Overnight, protesters battled security forces near parliament. They’re furious that the government knew about the 2,700 tons of explosive Ammonium nitrate stored at a facility in the port and did nothing about it, despite warnings from customs officials for years. That neglect resulted in Tuesday’s deadly blast.

Rescue teams continue to search for the dozen still missing next to the smoldering explosion site. Family members wait nearby hoping for a miracle because the alternative is unbearable. Tatiana, the daughter of a missing victim of the blast said, “I think he’s there, but I think if we continue to work slowly, probably, time will run out.” Others confront their grim new reality. Corporal Georges de Abbas was one of those taken in an instant. He was donating blood when the blast killed him.

On Thursday, people in the city greeted Emmanuel Macron with chants calling for a revolution. The French President vowed to help the people, not the politicians, “We need an open and transparent International Investigation to avoid, first of all, things being hidden, but also to stop doubt setting in.”

For now residents of Beirut start the long process of piecing their lives back together. An insurmountable task to repair a city of broken homes and broken hearts. More than 25 countries including the U.S. have offered aid to Lebanon including desperately needed money, medical supplies and food.

©2020 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.